NVQ 2357

Knowledge
Units

City & Guilds NVQ 2357 Level 3 in Electrotechnical Technology – Knowledge Units

When working through your NVQ 2357 Level 3 Electrical Installation or Electrical Maintenance qualification you will find each unit requires that “Prior to undertaking this unit a learner must provide auditable evidence that they have the relevant knowledge and understanding of…
at least one, and sometimes more, ‘Knowledge Units’.

Below you will find full details of all Knowledge Units – 601 to 609 – that you must be able to prove an understanding of before commencement of any particular Level 3 unit.

However, you will also notice on each of these Knowledge Units that they may have been covered on qualifications you may already have, such as the City & Guilds 2365 & 2330 Level 2 & Level 3.

Unit 601 – Understanding Health and Safety Legislation, Practices and Procedures (Installing and Maintaining Electrotechnical Systems and Equipment)

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand Health and Safety legislation, practices and procedures associated when installing and maintaining electrotechnical systems and equipment. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of Health and Safety legislation, practices and procedures.

** The City & Guilds 2365 Level 2 or 2330 Level 2 covers the knowledge criteria for this unit. **

Learning Outcomes

There are four learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:

  1. Understand how relevant Health and Safety legislation applies in the workplace
  2. Understand the procedures for dealing with Health and Safety in the work environment
  3. Understand the procedures for establishing a safe working environment
  4. Understand the requirements for identifying and dealing with hazards in the work environment.
Outcome 1 - Understand how relevant Health and Safety legislation applies in the workplace

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify their own roles and responsibilities and those of others with regard to current relevant legislation
2. Specify particular Health and Safety risks which may be present and the requirements of current health and safety legislation for the range of electrotechnical work operations.

Relevant legislation:
* The Health and Safety at Work Act
* The Electricity at Work Regulations
* The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations
* Workplace (Health and Safety and Welfare) Regulations
* Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations
* Working at Height Regulations
* Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations
* Manual Handling Operations Regulations
* Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations
* Display Screen Equipment at Work Regulations
* Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations

Work operations:
* Preparation and planning
* Installation
* Termination and connection
* Inspection, testing and commissioning
* Fault diagnosis and rectification
* Maintenance

Outcome 2 - Understand the procedures for dealing with Health and Safety in the work environment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the procedures that should be followed in the case of accidents which involve injury, including requirements for the treatment of electric shock / electrical burns
2. Specify appropriate procedures which should be followed when emergency situations occur in the workplace
3. State the limitations of their responsibilities in terms of Health and Safety in the workplace
4. State the actions to be taken in situations which exceed their level of responsibility for Health and Safety in the workplace
5. State the procedures that should be followed in accordance with the relevant Health and Safety regulations for reporting health, safety and/or welfare issues in the workplace.
6. Specify appropriate responsible persons to whom health and safety and welfare related matters should be reported.

Appropriate procedures:
* Procedures for summoning emergency services
* Information that emergency services require
* Alarm and evacuation procedures
* Designated escape routes
* Fire fighting procedures
* Application of first aid

Appropriate responsible persons:
* Employer
* Employees
* Customer / client
* Safety officers
* Health & Safety executive/inspectors
* Trades union representative
* Environmental health officers

Outcome 3 - Understand the procedures for establishing a safe working environment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the procedure for producing risk assessments and method statements in accordance with their level of responsibility
2. Describe the procedures for working in accordance with provided, predetermined.
3. Describe the procedures that should be taken to remove or minimise risks before deciding PPE is needed
4. State the purpose of PPE
5. Specify the appropriate protective clothing and equipment that is required for identified work tasks
6. State the first aid facilities that must be available in the work area in accordance with health and safety regulations
7. Explain why it is important not to misuse first aid equipment / supplies and to replace first aid supplies once used
8. Describe safe practices and procedures in the working environment.

Procedures:
* Risk assessments
* Method statements
* Safe systems of work

Working environment:
* Access equipment (PASMA requirements)
* Portable power tools (eg cartridge gun, drills, grinders)
* Signs and guarding
* Tools and materials storage facilities
* Dangerous substances, eg cutting compounds and adhesives

Outcome 4 - Understand the requirements for identifying and dealing with hazards in the work environment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Identify warning signs for the seven main groups of hazardous substance, as defined by The Chemical (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations (CHIP)
2. Define what is meant by the term hazard in relation to Health and Safety legislation in the workplace
3. Identify specific hazards associated with the installation and maintenance of electrotechnical systems and equipment
4. Describe situations which can constitute a hazard in the workplace
5. Explain practices and procedures for addressing hazards in the workplace
6. Identify the correct type of fire extinguisher for a particular type of fire
7. Explain situations where asbestos may be encountered
8. Specify the procedures for dealing with the suspected presence of asbestos in the workplace.

Specific hazards:
* Electric shock (direct and indirect contact)
* Burns
* Fires
* Explosions

Situations:
* Temporary electrical supplies
* Trailing leads / cables
* Slippery or uneven surfaces
* Presence of dust and fumes
* Handling and transporting equipment or materials
* Contaminants and irritants
* Fire
* Working at height
* Hazardous malfunctions of equipment
* Improper use and storage of tools and equipment

Hazards in the workplace:
* Temporary electrical supplies
* Trailing leads / cables
* Slippery or uneven surfaces
* Presence of dust and fumes
* Handling and transporting equipment or materials
* Contaminants and irritants
* Fire
* Working at height
* Hazardous malfunctions of equipment
* Improper use and storage of tools and equipment

Where asbestos may be encountered:
* In decorative finishes (aertex, plaster, floor tiles)
* In accessories (flash guards and matting in fuse carriers and on distribution board covers)
* In insulation storage compartments, vessels and pipework

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Unit 602 – Understanding Environmental Legislation, Working Practices and the Principles of Environmental Technology Systems

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand environmental legislation, working practices and the principles of environmental technology systems. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills and working practices appropriate to relevant legislation and systems.

** If you have already achieved your City & Guilds 2330 Level 2 & 2330 Level 3 then you will need to complete this knowledge unit and all the performance units. **

Learning Outcomes

There are three learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
 .

  1. Understand the environmental legislation, working practices and principles which are relevant to work activities
  2. Understand how work methods and procedures can reduce material wastage and impact on the environment
  3. Understand how and where environmental technology systems can be applied.
Outcome 1 - Understand the environmental legislation, working practices and principles which are relevant to work activities

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Specify the current, relevant legislation for processing waste
2. Describe what is meant by the term ‘environment’
3. Describe the ways in which the environment may be affected by work activities
4. Identify and interpret the requirements for electrical installations as outlined in relevant sections of the Building Regulations and the Code for Sustainable Homes
5. State materials and products that are classed as:
* Hazardous to the environment
* Recyclable
6. Describe the organisational procedures for processing materials that are classed as:
* Hazardous to the environment
* Recyclable

Current, relevant legislation:
* Environmental Protection Act
* The Hazardous Waste Regulations
* Pollution Prevention and Control Act
* Control of Pollution Act
* The Control of Noise at Work Regulations
* Packaging (Essential Requirements) Regulations
* Environment Act
* The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations

Affect of work activities:
* Land contamination
* Air pollution
* Pollution of water courses

Outcome 2 - Understand how work methods and procedures can reduce material wastage and impact on the environment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State installation methods that can help to reduce material wastage
2. Explain why it is important to report any hazards to the environment that arise from work procedures
3. Specify environmentally friendly materials, products and procedures that can be used in the installation and maintenance of electrotechnical systems and equipment.

Outcome 3 - Understand how and where environmental technology systems can be applied

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Describe the fundamental operating principles of environmental technology systems
2. State the applications and limitations of environmental technology systems
3. State the Local Authority Building Control requirements which apply to the installation of environmental technology systems.

Environmental technology systems:
* Solar photovoltaic
* Wind energy generation (Micro and macro)
* Micro hydro generation
* Heat pumps
* Combined heat and power (CHP) including micro CHP
* Grey water recycling
* Rainwater harvesting
* Biomass heating
* Solar thermal hot water heating

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Unit 603 – Understanding the Practices and Procedures for Overseeing and Organising the Work Environment (Electrical Installation)

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand practices and procedures for overseeing and organising the work environment for the installation of electrotechnical systems and equipment. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills for overseeing and organising the work environment.

** If you have already achieved your City & Guilds 2330 Level 2 or 2365 Level 2 and 2365 Level 3 then you will just need to complete “bridging assessment” covering units 603 and all the performance units. **

Learning Outcomes

There are six learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
.

  1. Understand the types of technical and functional information that is available for the installation of electrotechnical systems and equipment
  2. Understand the procedures for supplying technical and functional information to relevant people
  3. Understand the requirements for overseeing Health and Safety in the work environment
  4. Understand the requirements for liaising with others when organising and overseeing work activities
  5. Understand the requirements for organising and overseeing work programmes
  6. Understand the requirements for organising the provision and storage of resources that are required for work activities.
Outcome 1 - Understand the types of technical and functional information that is available for the installation of electrotechnical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify sources of technical and functional information which apply to electrotechnical installations
2. Interpret technical and functional information and data
3. Identify and interpret technical and functional information relating to electrotechnical product or equipment
4. Describe the work site requirements and procedures in terms of:
* Services provision
* Ventilation provision
* Waste disposal procedures
* Equipment and material storage
* Health and safety requirements
* Access by personnel
5. Identify equipment and systems that are compatible to site operations and requirements.

Sources of technical and functional information:
* Manufacturer information and data
* Supplier information and data
* Information from their employing organisation
* Installation specifications
* Client / customer specifications
* Specifications, drawings and diagrams

Technical and functional information and data:
* Manufacturer information and data
– Materials
– Components
– Equipment
– Measuring and test instruments
* Supplier information and data
– Materials
– Components
– Equipment
– Measuring and test instruments
* Information from their employing organisation
* Installation specifications
* Client / customer specifications
* Specifications, drawings and diagrams
* Records and certificates for –
– Inspection
– Testing
– Installation completion

Technical and functional information and data relating to electrotechnical product or equipment:
* Operation
* Controls
* Settings
* Adjustments

Outcome 2 - Understand the procedures for supplying technical and functional information to relevant people

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the limits of their responsibility for supplying technical and functional information to others
2. Specify organisational policies / procedures for the handover and demonstration of electrotechnical systems, products and equipment, including requirements for confirming and recording handover
3. State the appropriateness of different customer relations methods and procedures
4. Identify methods of providing technical and function information appropriate to the needs of others
5. Explain the importance of ensuring that:
* Information provided is accurate and complete
* Information is provided clearly, courteously and professionally
* Copies of information provided are retained
* The installation, on completion, functions in accordance with the specification, is safe and complies with industry standards.
6. Describe methods for checking that relevant persons have an adequate understanding of the technical and non-technical information provided, including appropriate Health and Safety information.

Others:
* Clients
* Customers
* Major contractors
* Other services
* Site managers

Outcome 3 - Understand the requirements for overseeing Health and Safety in the work environment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the applicable Health and Safety requirements with regard to overseeing the work of others
2. State the procedures for:
* Interpreting risk assessments
* Applying method statements
* Monitoring changing conditions in the workplace
* Complying with site organisational procedures
* Managing Health and Safety on site
* Organising the safe and secure storage of tools and materials

Outcome 4 - Understand the requirements for liaising with others when organising and overseeing work activities

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Describe techniques for the communication with others for the purpose of:
* Motivation
* Instruction
* Monitoring
* Co-operation
2. Describe methods of determining the competence of operatives for whom they are responsible
3. Specify their role in terms of:
* Responsibility for other staff
* Liaison with their employer
* Communication with others
4. Identify appropriate methods for communicating with and responding to others
5. Specify procedures for re-scheduling work to co-ordinate with changing conditions in the workplace and to coincide with other trades
6. Clarify organisational procedures for completing the documentation that is required during work operations.

Methods:
* Checking competency cards (e.g. CSCS cards, JIB cards)
* Checking technical qualifications
* Written references from previous employers
* Informal monitoring of performance on site
* Competent Person Scheme Registration

Others:
* Customers
* Clients
* Site managers
* Major Contractors (where appropriate)
* Sub-contractors (where appropriate)
* Other services
* The public

Outcome 5 - Understand the requirements for organising and overseeing work programmes

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Describe how to plan:
* Work allocations
* Duties of operative for whom they are responsible
* Coordination with other services and personnel
2. Specify procedures for carrying out work activities that will:
* Maintain the safety of the work environment
* Maintain cost effectiveness
* Ensure compliance with the programmes of work
3. Identify the industry standards that are relevant to activities carried out during the installation of electrotechnical systems and equipment, including the current editions
4. Identify within the scope of the work programme and operations their responsibilities
5. Identify how to determine the estimated time required for the completion of the work required taking into account influential factors
6. State the possible consequences of not;
* Completing work within the estimated time
* Meeting the requirements of the programme of work
* Using the specified materials
* Installing materials and equipment as specified
7. Specify methods of producing and illustrating work programmes.

Current editions of industry standards:
* Management of Health and Safety regulations
* Health & Safety at Work Act
* Electricity at Work regulations
* Construction design and management
* BS 7671 requirements for electrical installations
* BS EN graphical symbols
* Employment Rights Act
* Data Protection Act
* Disability Discrimination Act
* Race Relations Act
* Sex Discrimination Act
* Human Rights Act

Influential factors:
* The deployment and availability of suitable personnel
* The delivery and availability of equipment, components and material
* Weather conditions
* Work to be completed by other services
* Specification variations

Work programmes:
* Bar charts
* Spreadsheets
* Critical Path Analysis

Outcome 6 - Understand the requirements for organising the provision and storage of resources that are required for work activities

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Interpret the installation specification and work programme to identify resource requirements for the following:
* Materials
* Components
* Plant
* Vehicles
* Equipment
* Labour
* Tools
* Measuring and test instruments
2. Interpret the material schedule to confirm that materials available are:
* The right type
* Fit for purpose
* In the correct quantity
* Suitable for work to be completed cost efficiently
3. Specify the storage and transportation requirements for all materials required in the work location
4. Specify procedures to ensure the safe and effective storage of materials, tools and equipment in the work location.

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Unit 604 – Understanding the Principles of Planning and Selection for the Installation of Electrotechnical Equipment and Systems in Buildings, Structures and the Environment

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand the principles associated with planning the installation of electrotechnical equipment and systems in buildings, structures and the environment and the selection of material, components and equipment. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills in the planning and selection of materials, equipment for completing an electrical installation in accordance with a specification.

** The City & Guilds 2365/2330 Level 2 and 2365/2330 Level 3 covers the knowledge criteria for this unit **

Learning Outcomes

There are four learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
.

  1. Understand the characteristics and applications of consumer supply systems
  2. Understand the principles of internal and external earthing arrangements for electrical installations for buildings, structures and the environment
  3. Understand the principles for selecting cables and circuit protection devices
  4. Understand the principles and procedures for selecting wiring systems, equipment and enclosures.
Outcome 1 - Understand the characteristics and applications of consumer supply systems

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Explain the characteristics and applications of consumer supply systems
2. Specify the arrangements for electrical installations and systems with regard to provision for:
* Isolation and switching
* Overcurrent protection
* Earth fault protection.

Consumer supply systems:
* Earthing arrangements:
– TN-S
– TNC-S
– TN-C
– TT
– IT
* Supply systems:
– Single phase
– Three phase
– Three phase and neutral

Outcome 2 - Understand the principles of internal and external earthing arrangements for electrical installations for buildings, structures and the environment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Explain the key principles relating to earthing and bonding
2. Explain the key principles relating to the protection of electrical systems
3. Explain the operating principles, applications and limitations of protective devices
4. Specify what is meant by the terms relating to earthing and the function of earth protection:
* Earth fault loop impedance
* Protective Multiple Earthing (PME).

Key principles:
* Automatic disconnection and the implications of exposed and extraneous conductive parts within a building forming a circuit to the mass of earth or Main Earthing Terminal (MET) under fault conditions
* The basic principles of shock protection, circuit overload and short-circuit protection:
– Maximum disconnection times for different types of circuit
– Discrimination between protective devices
– Fault current capacities of devices

Protective devices:
* RCDs/RCBOs
* Fuses (BS3036, re-wireable, BS1361/2 cartridges, BS88 HBC)
* CBs (thermal, magnetic and combined tripping)

Outcome 3 - Understand the principles for selecting cables and circuit protection devices

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Explain how external influences can affect the choice of wiring systems and enclosures
2. State the current ratings for different circuit protection devices
3. Specify and apply the procedure for selecting appropriate over current protection devices
4. State what is meant by diversity factors and explain how a circuits maximum demand is established after diversity factors are applied
5. Specify and apply the procedure for selecting a suitably sized cable
6. Determine the size of conduit and trunking as appropriate to the size and number of cables to be installed.

Procedure:
* Calculating the current demand of single and three phase circuits
* Selecting a protective device
* Applying factors for
– Grouping
– Thermal insulation
– Ambient temperature
– Installation condition or protective device type
* Establishing the installation method
* Selecting a suitably sized cable
* Checking voltage drop is not excessive
* Determining circuit disconnection times, as relevant, R1 + R2, Ze and Zs
* Considering thermal constraints

Outcome 4 - Understand the principles and procedures for selecting wiring systems, equipment and enclosures

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. State the criteria for correctly selecting wiring systems, equipment and enclosures as appropriate for systems

Systems:
* Lighting systems
* Power systems (final circuits)
* Distribution systems (sub mains)
* Environmental control / building management systems
* Emergency management systems
* Security systems – Fire Alarm / Prevention; Unlawful Entry; Emergency Lighting
* Closed Circuit TV, communication and data transmission systems.

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Unit 605 – Understanding the Practices and Procedures for the Preparation and Installation of Wiring Systems and Electrotechnical Equipment in Buildings, Structures and the Environment

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand and interpret the practices and procedures for the preparation and installation of wiring systems and electrotechnical equipment in buildings, structures and the environment. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills of preparing and installing electrotechnical systems and equipment.

** If you have already achieved your City & Guilds 2330 Level 2 or 2365 Level 2 and 2365 Level 3 then you will just need to complete “bridging assessment” covering units 605 and all the performance units. **

Learning Outcomes

There are seven learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
.

  1. Understand the procedures, practices and statutory and non-statutory regulatory requirements for preparing work sites for the installation of wiring systems and associated equipment
  2. Understand the procedures for checking the work location prior to the commencement of work activities
  3. Understand the practices, procedures and regulatory requirements for completing the safe isolation of electrical circuits and complete electrical installations
  4. Understand the types, applications and limitations of wiring systems and associated equipment
  5. Understand the procedures for selecting and using, tools, equipment and fixings for the installation of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures
  6. Understand the practices and procedures for installing wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures
  7. Know the regulatory requirements which apply to the installation of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures.
Outcome 1 - Understand the procedures, practices and statutory and non statutory regulatory requirements for preparing work sites for the installation of wiring systems and associated equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Explain the Health and Safety requirements and legal duties of employers and employees in establishing a safe working environment
2. Interpret relevant sources of information which will inform installation work
3. Specify the actions required to ensure that electrical installation work sites are correctly prepared in terms of Health and Safety considerations.

Sources of information:
* Statutory documents
* Codes of practice
* British standards
* Site drawings
* Installation specifications – wiring diagrams; fitting and fixing dimensions / drawings; technical data
* Manufacturer’s instructions

Actions required:
* Provision for safe access and egress
* Checking immediate work location for potential hazards as appropriate to property, personnel and livestock
* Know the requirements for the completion of a risk assessment
* Confirm that appropriate risk assessments and method statements have been produced

Outcome 2 - Understand the procedures for checking the work location prior to the commencement of work activities

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the preparations that should be completed before electrical installation work starts
2. Explain how to check for any pre-existing damage to customer / client property and state why it is important to do this prior to commencement of any work activity
3. State the actions that should be taken if pre-existing damage to customer / client property is identified
4. Specify methods for protecting the fabric and structure of the property before and during installation work.

Preparations:
* Interpretation of specifications to produce accurate material and equipment requisites
* Identification and selection of material, equipment and components compatible to installation specification
* Confirmation of site readiness for installation including considerations of building structures and fabric
* Confirmation that tools, equipment and instruments are fit for purpose
* Confirmation of secure site storage for tools, equipment, materials and components
* Identification of suitable access equipment
* Identification of suitable lifting equipment
* Identification of suitable installation, fixing and fitting methods
* Identification of points in the installation programme where coordination with other trades and personnel may be necessary

Pre-existing damage to:
* Building wall/floor fabric
* Equipment and components
* Building décor and floor finishes

Outcome 3 - Understand the practices, procedures and regulatory requirements for completing the safe isolation of electrical circuits and complete electrical installations

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify and undertake the correct procedure for completing safe isolation with regard to:
* Carrying out safe working practices
* Correct identification of circuit(s) to be isolated
* Identifying suitable points of isolation
* Selecting correct test and proving instruments in accordance with relevant industry guidance and standards
* Correct testing methods
* Selecting locking devices for securing isolation
* Correct warning notices
* Correct sequence for the safe-isolation of an electrical circuit and complete electrical installation.
2. State the implications of carrying out safe isolations to:
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (loss of supply).
3. State the implications of not carrying out safe isolation to:
* Self
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (presence of supply).

Outcome 4 - Understand the types, applications and limitations of wiring systems and associated equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the constructional features, applications, advantages and limitations of types of cable
2. State the constructional features, applications, advantages and limitations of types of cable and conductor containment systems
3. Describe how environmental factors can affect the selection of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures
4. State the types of wiring systems and associated equipment used for:
* Lighting systems
* Power systems (final circuits)
* Distribution systems (sub mains)
* Environmental control / building management systems
* Emergency management systems
* Security systems – fire alarm / prevention; unlawful entry; emergency lighting
* Closed circuit TV, communication and data transmission systems.

Types of cable:
* Thermosetting insulated cables including flexes
* Single and multicore thermoplastic (PVC) and thermosetting insulated cables
* PVC/PVC flat profile cable
* MICC (with and without PVC sheath)
* SWA cables (PILC, XLPE, PVC)
* Armoured / braided flexible cables and cords
* Data cables
* Fibre optic cable
* Fire resistant cable

Types of cable and conductor containment systems
* Conduit (PVC and metallic)
* Trunking (PVC and metallic)
* Cable tray
* Cable basket
* Ladder systems
* Ducting
* Modular wiring systems
* Busbar systems and Powertrack

Environmental factors:
* Ambient temperature
* Effect of moisture on insulation
* Corrosive substances
* UV rays
* Damage by animals
* Mechanical stress and vibration damage
* Aesthetic considerations
* Exposure to the elements

Outcome 5 - Understand the procedures for selecting and using, tools, equipment and fixings for the installation of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the procedures for selecting and safely using appropriate hand tools, power tools and adhesives for electrical installation work
2. State the procedures for selecting and safely using equipment for measuring and marking out for wiring systems, equipment and enclosures
3. State the criteria for selecting and safely using tools and equipment for fixing and installing wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures
4. State the criteria for selecting and safely using fixing devices for wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures, giving consideration to
* Load bearing capacity
* Fabric of structure
* Environmental considerations
* Aesthetic considerations.

Outcome 6 - Understand the practices and procedures for installing wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify and apply the installation methods and procedures to ensure that in accordance with the installation specification and statutory and non-statutory regulations:
* Wiring systems, enclosures, cables and components are securely fixed and installed
* A wiring system’s mechanical integrity is maintained
* No damage to the wiring system or its components has occurred
2. Specify methods and techniques for restoring the building fabric.

Outcome 7 - Know the regulatory requirements which apply to the installation of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify the main requirements of the following topics in accordance with the current version of the IEE wiring regulations and describe how they impact upon the installation of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures:
* Selection and erection of wiring systems, associated equipment and enclosures
* Isolation and switching
* Protection against fire
* Protection against electric shock
* Special locations.
* Segregation.
* Flammable / explosive atmospheres.

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Unit 606 – Understanding the Principles, Practices and Legislation for the Termination and Connection of Conductors, Cables and Cords in Electrical Systems

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand and interpret the principles, practices and legislation associated with the termination and connection of conductors, cables and cords in electrotechnical systems. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills for terminating and connecting conductors, cables and cords in electrotechnical systems in accordance with statutory and non-statutory regulations / requirements.

** The City & Guilds 2365/2330 Level 2 and 2365/2330 Level 3 covers the knowledge criteria for this unit. **

Learning Outcomes

There are three learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
.

  1. Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the safe isolation of electrical circuits and complete electrical installations
  2. Understand the regulatory requirements and procedures for terminating and connecting conductors, cables and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment
  3. Understand the procedures and applications of different methods of terminating and connecting conductors, cables, and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment.
Outcome 1 - Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the safe isolation of electrical circuits and complete electrical installations

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the implications of carrying out safe isolations to:
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (loss of supply)
2. State the implications of not carrying out safe isolations to:
* Self
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (presence of supply)
3. Specify and undertake the correct procedure for completing safe isolation with regard to:
* Carrying out safe working practices
* Correct identification of circuit(s) to be isolated
* Identifying suitable points of isolation
* Selecting correct test and proving instruments in accordance with relevant industry guidance and standards
* Correct testing methods
* Selecting locking devices for securing isolation
* Correct warning notices
* Correct sequence for the safe-isolation of an electrical circuit and complete electrical installation.

Outcome 2 - Understand the regulatory requirements and procedures for terminating and connecting conductors, cables and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Identify and interpret appropriate sources of relevant information for the termination and connection of conductors, cables and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment
2. Specify organisational procedures for reporting variations to the installation specification
3. Describe methods and procedures appropriate to the installation environment to ensure the safe and effective termination and connection of conductors, cables and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment.

Sources of relevant information:
* Statutory documents
* Codes of practice
* British standards
* IEE wiring regulations
* Manufacturers’ instructions
* Installation specifications

Wiring systems and equipment:
* Thermosetting insulated cables including flexes
* Single and multicore thermoplastic (PVC) and thermosetting insulated cables
* PVC/PVC flat profile cable
* MICC (with and without PVC sheath)
* SWA cables (PILC, XLPE, PVC)
* Armoured / braided flexible cables and cords
* Data cables
* Fibre optic cable
* Fire resistant cable

Outcome 3 - Understand the procedures and applications of different methods of terminating and connecting conductors, cables, and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Explain the advantages, limitations and applications of the following connection methods:
* Screw
* Crimped
* Soldered
* Non-screw compression
2. Describe the procedures for proving that terminations and connections are electrically and mechanically sound
3. Explain the consequences of terminations not being electrically and mechanically sound in terms of:
* High resistance joints
* Corrosion and erosion
4. Specify the Health and Safety requirements appropriate to terminating and connecting conductors, cables and flexible cords in electrical wiring systems and equipment
5. Interpret and apply the techniques and methods for the safe and effective termination and connection of:
* Thermosetting insulated cables including flexes
* Single and multicore thermoplastic (PVC) and thermosetting insulated cables
* PVC/PVC flat profile cable
* MICC (with and without PVC sheath)
* SWA cables (PILC, XLPE, PVC)
* Armoured / braided flexible cables and cords
* Data cables
* Fibre optic cable
* fire resistant cable.

Health and Safety requirements:
* Selection and use of tools
* PPE
* Risk assessment
* Reporting of unsafe situations
* Adherence to relevant statutory and non-statutory regulations

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Unit 607 – Understanding Principles, Practices and Legislation for the Inspection, Testing, Commissioning and Certification of Electrotechnical Systems and Equipment in Buildings, Structures and the Environment

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand principles, practices and legislation for the inspection, testing, commissioning and certification of electrotechnical systems and equipment in buildings, structures and the environment in accordance with statutory and non-statutory regulations and requirements. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills for the inspection, testing, commissioning and certification of electrotechnical systems and equipment in buildings, structures and the environment.

** The City & Guilds 2365/2330 Level 2 and 2365/2330 Level 3 covers the knowledge criteria for this unit. **

Learning Outcomes

There are five learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
.

  1. Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the safe isolation of an electrical circuit and complete electrical installations in preparation for inspection, testing and commissioning
  2. Understand the principles and regulatory requirements for inspecting, testing and commissioning electrical systems, equipment and components
  3. Understand the regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the inspection of electrical installations
  4. Understand the regulatory requirements and procedures for the safe testing and commissioning of electrical installations
  5. Understand the procedures and requirements for the completion of electrical installation certificates and related documentation.
Outcome 1 - Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the safe isolation of an electrical circuit and complete electrical installations in preparation for inspection, testing and commissioning

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the requirements of the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 for the safe inspection of electrical systems and equipment, in terms of those carrying out the work and those using the building during the inspection
2. Specify and undertake the correct procedure for completing safe isolation
3. State the implications of carrying out safe isolations to
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (loss of supply).
4. State the implications of not carrying out safe isolations to
* Self
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (presence of supply).
5. Identify all Health and Safety requirements which apply when inspecting, testing and commissioning electrical installations and circuits including those which cover:
* Working in accordance with risk assessments / permits to work/method statements
* Safe use of tools and equipment
* Safe and correct use of measuring instruments
* Provision and use of PPE
* Reporting of unsafe situations.

Correct procedure:
* Carrying out safe working practices
* Correct identification of circuit(s) to be isolated
* Identifying suitable points of isolation
* Selecting correct test and proving instruments in accordance with relevant industry guidance and standards
* Correct testing methods
* Selecting locking devices for securing isolation
* Correct warning notices
* Correct sequence for isolating circuits

Outcome 2 - Understand the principles and regulatory requirements for inspecting, testing and commissioning electrical systems, equipment and components

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the purpose of and requirements for initial verification and periodic inspection of electrical installations
2. Identify and interpret the requirements of the relevant documents associated with the inspection, testing and commissioning of an electrical installation
3. Specify the information that is required to correctly conduct the initial verification of an electrical installation in accordance with the IEE wiring regulations and IEE Guidance Note 3.

Relevant documents:
* Electricity at Work Regulations 1989
* IEE wiring regulations
* IEE Guidance Note 3

Outcome 3 - Understand the regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the inspection of electrical installations

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Identify the items to be checked during the inspection process for given electrotechnical systems and equipment, and their locations as detailed in the IEE wiring regulations
2. State how human senses (sight, touch etc) can be used during the inspection process
3. State the items of an electrical installation that should be inspected in accordance with IEE Guidance Note 3
4. Specify the requirements for the inspection of the following:
* Earthing conductors
* Circuit protective conductors
* Protective bonding conductors:
– Main bonding conductors
– Supplementary bonding conductors
* Isolation
* Type and rating of overcurrent protective devices.

Outcome 4 - Understand the regulatory requirements and procedures for the safe testing and commissioning of electrical installations

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the tests to be carried out on an electrical installation in accordance with the IEE wiring regulations and IEE Guidance Note 3
2. Identify the correct instrument for the test to be carried out in terms of:
* The instrument is fit for purpose
* Identifying the right scale / settings of the instrument appropriate to the test to be carried out
3. Specify the requirements for the safe and correct use of instruments to be used for testing and commissioning
4. Explain why it is necessary for test results to comply with standard values and state the actions to take in the event of unsatisfactory results being obtained
5. Explain why testing is carried out in the exact order as specified in the IEE wiring regulations and IEE Guidance Note 3
6. State the reasons why it is necessary to verify the continuity of circuit protective conductors, earthing conductors, bonding conductors and ring final circuit conductors
7. Specify and apply the methods for verifying the continuity of circuit protective conductors and ring final circuit conductors and interpreting the obtained results
8. State the effects that cables connected in parallel and variations in cable length can have on insulation resistance values
9. Interpret and apply the procedures for completing insulation resistance testing
10. Explain why it is necessary to verify polarity
11. Interpret and apply the procedures for testing to identify correct polarity
12. Specify and apply the methods for measuring earth electrode resistance and correctly interpreting the results
13. Identify the earth fault loop paths for the following systems:
* TN-S
* TN-C-S
* TT
14. State the methods for verifying protection by automatic disconnection of the supply
15. Specify the methods for determining prospective fault current
16. Specify the methods for testing the correct operation of residual current devices (RCDs)
17. State the methods used to check for the correct phase sequence
18. Explain why having the correct phase sequence is important
19. State the need for functional testing and identify items which need to be checked
20. Specify the methods used for verification of voltage drop
21. State the cause of volt-drop in an electrical installation
22. State the appropriate procedures for dealing with customers and clients during the commissioning and certification process.

Requirements:
* Checks required proving that test instruments and leads are safe and functioning correctly
* The need for instruments to be regularly checked and calibrated and that this be done in accordance with the requirements of the IEE wiring regulations and other relevant guidance documents (HSE guidance document GS38)

Procedures:
* Precautions to be taken before conducting insulation resistance tests
* Methods of testing insulation resistance
* The required test voltages and minimum insulation resistance values for circuits operating at various voltages

Systems:
* TN-S
* TN-C-S
* TT

Methods:
* The measurement of the earth fault loop impedance (Zs) and external impedance (Ze)
* Establishing Ze from enquiry
* Calculate the value of Zs from given information
* Comparing Zs and the maximum tabulated figures as specified in the IEE wiring regulations

Appropriate procedures:
* Ensuring the safety of customers and clients during the completion of work activities
* Keeping customers and clients informed during the process
* Labelling electrical circuits, systems and equipment that is yet to be commissioned
* Providing customers and clients with all appropriate documentation upon work completion

Outcome 5 - Understand the procedures and requirements for the completion of electrical installation certificates and related documentation

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Explain the purpose of and relationship between:
* An electrical installation certificate
* A minor electrical installation works certificate
* Schedule of inspections
* Schedule of test results
2. State the information that must be contained within:
* An electrical installation certificate
* A minor electrical installation works certificate
* Schedule of inspections
* Schedule of test results
3. Describe the certification process for a completed installation and identify the responsibilities of different relevant personnel in relation to the completion of the certification process
4. Explain the procedures and requirements, in accordance with the IEE wiring regulations, IEE Guidance Note 3 and where appropriate customer / client requirements for the recording and retention of completed:
* Electrical installation certificates
* Minor electrical installation works certificates
* Schedule of inspections
* Schedule of test results

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Unit 608 – Understanding the Principles, Practices and Legislation for Diagnosing and Correcting Electrical Faults in Electrotechnical Systems and Equipment in Buildings, Structures and the Environment

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand principles, practices and legislation associated with diagnosing and correcting electrical faults in electrotechnical systems and equipment in buildings, structures and the environment in accordance with statutory and nonstatutory regulations and requirements. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills used for fault diagnosis and correction in electrotechnical systems and equipment in buildings, structures and the environment.

** The City & Guilds 2365/2330 Level 2 and 2365/2330 Level 3 covers the knowledge criteria for this unit. **

Learning Outcomes

There are five learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
.

  1. Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the safe isolation of electrical circuits and complete electrical installations
  2. Understand how to complete the reporting and recording of electrical fault diagnosis and correction work
  3. Understand how to complete the preparatory work prior to fault diagnosis and correction work
  4. Understand the procedures and techniques for diagnosing electrical faults
  5. Understand the procedures and techniques for correcting electrical faults.
Outcome 1 - Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing the safe isolation of electrical circuits and complete electrical installations

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify and undertake the correct procedure for completing the safe isolation of an electrical circuit
2. State the implications of carrying out safe isolations to:
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (loss of supply)
3. State the implications of not carrying out safe isolations to:
* Self
* Other personnel
* Customers / clients
* Public
* Building systems (presence of supply)
4. Identify all Health and Safety requirements which apply when diagnosing and correcting electrical faults in electrotechnical systems and equipment including those which cover:
* Working in accordance with risk assessments/permits to work / method statements
* Safe use of tools and equipment
* Safe and correct use of measuring instruments
* Provision and use of PPE
* Reporting of unsafe situations.

Correct procedure:
* Assessment of safe working practices
* Correct identification of circuits to be isolated
* The selection of suitable points of isolation
* The selection of correct test and proving instruments in accordance with relevant industry guidance and standards
* The use of correct testing methods
* The selection of locking devices for securing isolation
* The use of correct warning notices
* The correct sequence for isolating circuits

Outcome 2 - Understand how to complete the reporting and recording of electrical fault diagnosis and correction work

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the procedures for reporting and recording information on electrical fault diagnosis and correction work
2. State the procedures for informing relevant persons about information on electrical fault diagnosis and correction work and the completion of relevant documentation
3. Explain why it is important to provide relevant persons with information on fault diagnosis and correction work clearly, courteously and accurately.

Outcome 3 - Understand how to complete the preparatory work prior to fault diagnosis and correction work

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify safe working procedures that should be adopted for completion of fault diagnosis and correction work
2. Interpret and apply the logical stages of fault diagnosis and correction work that should be followed
3. Identify and describe common symptoms of electrical faults
4. State the causes of the following types of fault:
* High resistance
* Transient voltages
* Insulation failure
* Excess current
* Short-circuit
* Open circuit
5. Specify the types of faults and their likely locations in:
* Wiring systems
* Terminations and connections
* Equipment / accessories (switches, luminaries, switchgear and control equipment)
* Instrumentation / metering
6. State the special precautions that should be taken with regard to the following:
* Lone working
* Hazardous areas
* Fibre-optic cabling
* Electro-static discharge (friction, induction, separation)
* Electronic devices (damage by over voltage)
* IT equipment (e.g. shutdown, damage)
* High frequency or capacitive circuits
* Presence of batteries (e.g. lead-acid cells, connecting cells).

Safe working procedures:
* Effective communication with others in the work area
* Use of barriers
* Positioning of notices
* Safe isolation

Logical stages:
* Identification of symptoms
* Collection and analysis of data
* Use of sources / types of information such as the IEE Wiring Regulations, Installation Certificates, Installation Specifications, drawings / diagrams, manufacturer’s information and operating instructions
* Maintenance records
* Experience (personal and of others)
* Checking and testing (eg supply, protective devices)
* Interpreting results / information
* Fault correction
* Functional testing
* Restoration

Symptoms of electrical faults:
* Loss of supply
* Low voltage
* Operation of overload or fault current devices
* Component / equipment, malfunction / failure
* Arcing

Outcome 4 - Understand the procedures and techniques for diagnosing electrical faults

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. State the dangers of electricity in relation to the nature of fault diagnosis work
2. Describe how to identify supply voltages
3. Select the correct test instruments (in accordance with HSE guidance document GS 38) for fault diagnosis work
4. Describe how to confirm test instruments are fit for purpose, functioning correctly and are correctly calibrated
5. State the appropriate documentation that is required for fault diagnosis work and explain how and when it should be completed
6. Explain why carrying out fault diagnosis work can have implications for customers and clients
7. Specify and undertake the procedures for carrying out the following tests and their relationship to fault diagnosis:
* Continuity
* Insulation resistance
* Polarity
* Earth fault loop impedance
* RCD operation
* Current and voltage measurement
* Phase sequence
8. Identify whether test results are acceptable and state the actions to take where unsatisfactory results are obtained.

Test instruments:
* Voltage indicator
* Low resistance ohm meter
* Insulation resistance testers
* EFLI and PFC tester
* RCD tester
* Tong tester / clamp on ammeter
* Phase sequence tester

Outcome 5 - Understand the procedures and techniques for correcting electrical faults

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Identify and explain factors which can affect fault correction, repair or replacement
2. Specify the procedures for functional testing and identify tests that can verify fault correction.
3. State the appropriate documentation that is required for fault correction work and explain how and when it should be completed
4. Explain how and why relevant people need to be kept informed during completion of fault correction work
5. Specify the methods for restoring the condition of building fabric
6. State the methods to ensure the safe disposal of any waste and that the work area is left in a safe and clean condition.

Factors:
* Cost
* Availability of replacement parts, resources and staff
* Downtime (planning)
* Legal and personal responsibility (eg contracts, warranties, relevant personnel)
* Access to systems and equipment
* Provision of emergency or stand by supplies
* Client demand (continuous supply, out of hours working)

Tests:
* Continuity
* Insulation resistance
* Polarity
* Earth fault loop impedance
* RCD operation
* Values of current and voltage
* Phase sequencing

Relevant people:
* Other workers / colleagues
* Customers / clients
* Representatives of other services

Building fabric:
* Brickwork
* Plastering
* Decorative finishings
* Supporting structures

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Unit 609 – Understanding the Electrical Principles Associated with the Design, Building, Installation and Maintenance of Electrical Equipment and Systems

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand the relationship between electrical scientific principles and the competencies required of a qualified electrical operative. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills in the installation and maintenance of electrotechnical systems and equipment.

** The City & Guilds 2365/2330 Level 2 and 2365/2330 Level 3 covers the knowledge criteria for this unit. **

Learning Outcomes

There are twelve learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
. 

  1. Understand mathematical principles which are appropriate to electrical installation, maintenance and design work
  2. Understand standard units of measurement used in electrical installation, maintenance and design work
  3. Understand basic mechanics and the relationship between force, work, energy and power
  4. Understand the relationship between resistance, resistivity, voltage, current and power
  5. Understand the fundamental principles which underpin the relationship between magnetism and electricity
  6. Understand electrical supply and distribution systems
  7. Understand how different electrical properties can affect electrical circuits, systems and equipment
  8. Understand the operating principles and applications of DC machines and AC motors
  9. Understand the operating principles of different electrical components
  10. Understand the principles and applications of electrical lighting systems
  11. Understand the principles and applications of electrical heating
  12. Understand the types, applications and limitations of electronic components in electrotechnical systems and equipment.
Outcome 1 - Understand mathematical principles which are appropriate to electrical installation, maintenance and design work

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Identify and apply appropriate mathematical principles which are relevant to electrotechnical work tasks.

Mathematical principles:
* Fractions and percentages
* Algebra
* Indices
* Powers of 10
* Transposition
* Triangles and trigonometry
* Statistics

Outcome 2 - Understand standard units of measurement used in electrical installation, maintenance and design work

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Identify and use internationally recognised (SI) units of measurement for general variables
2. Identify and determine values of basic SI units which apply specifically to electrical variables
3. Identify appropriate electrical instruments for the measurement and calculation of different electrical values.

(SI) Units of measurement:
* Length
* Area
* Volume
* Mass
* Density
* Time
* Temperature
* Velocity

Values of basic SI units:
* Resistance
* Resistivity
* Power
* Frequency
* Current
* Voltage
* Energy
* Impedance
* Inductance and inductive reactance
* Capacitance and capacitive reactance
* Power factor
* Actual power
* Reactive power
* Apparent power

Electrical values:
* Resistance
* Power
* Frequency
* Current
* Voltage
* Energy
* Impedance

Outcome 3 - Understand basic mechanics and the relationship between force, work, energy and power

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify what is meant by mass and weight
2. Explain the principles of basic mechanics as they apply to levers, gears and pulleys
3. Describe the main principles of the following and their inter-relationships:
* Force
* Work
* Energy (kinetic and potential)
* Power
* Efficiency
4. Calculate values of electrical energy, power and efficiency.

Outcome 4 - Understand the relationship between resistance, resistivity, voltage, current and power

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify what is meant by mass and weight
2. Identify and differentiate between materials which are good conductors and insulators
3. State the types and properties of different electrical cables
4. Describe what is meant by resistance and resistivity in relation to electrical circuits
5. Explain the relationship between current, voltage and resistance in parallel and series D.C. circuits
6. Calculate the values of current, voltage and resistance in parallel and series D.C. circuits
7. Calculate values of power in parallel and series D.C. circuits
8. State what is meant by the term voltage drop in relation to electrical circuits
9. Describe the chemical and thermal effects of electrical currents.

Outcome 5 - Understand the fundamental principles which underpin the relationship between magnetism and electricity

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Describe the magnetic effects of electrical currents in terms of:
* Production of a magnetic field
* Force on a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field
* Electromagnetism
* Electromotive force
2. Describe the basic principles of generating an A.C. supply in terms of:
* A single-loop generator
* Sine-wave
* Frequency
* EMF
* Magnetic flux
3. Explain how characteristics of a sine-wave affect the values of A.C. voltage and current.

Characteristics of a sine-wave:
* Root Mean Square (RMS) values
* Average value

Outcome 6 - Understand electrical supply and distribution systems

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Describe how electricity is generated and transmitted for domestic and industrial / commercial consumption
2. Specify the features and characteristics of a generation and transmission system
3. Explain how electricity is generated from other sources
4. Describe the main characteristics of:
* Single phase electrical supplies
* Three phase electrical supplies
* Three phase and neutral supplies
* Earth-fault loop path
* Star and delta connections
5. Describe the operating principles, applications and limitations of transformers
6. State the different types of transformer that are used in electrical supply and distribution networks
7. Determine by calculation and measurement:
* Primary and secondary voltages
* Primary and secondary current
* kVA rating of a transformer.

Features and characteristics:
* Power Stations:
– fossil fuel
– hydro
– oil
– nuclear
* Super-grid and standard grid system
* Transformers
* Transmission voltages
* Sub-stations
* Above and below ground distribution

Other sources:
* Batteries and cells
* Solar power (thermal and photovoltaic)
* Wind energy
* Wave energy
* Micro hydro
* Ground source heat pumps
* Combined heat and power (CHP) including micro CHP

Operating principles, applications and limitations:
* Relationship between current and voltage
* Primary and secondary windings
* Transformer types
* Step up and step down transformers

Outcome 7 - Understand how different electrical properties can effect electrical circuits, systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Explain the relationship between resistance, inductance, capacitance and impedance
2. Calculate unknown values of resistance, inductance, inductive reactance, capacitance, capacitive reactance and impedance
3. Explain the relationship between kW, kVAr, kVA and power factor
4. Calculate power factor
5. Explain what is meant by power factor correction and load balancing (neutral current)
6. Specify methods of power factor correction
7. Determine the neutral current in a three-phase and neutral supply
8. Calculate values of voltage and current in star and delta connected systems.

Outcome 8 - Understand the operating principles and applications of DC machines and AC motors

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. State the basic types, applications and describe the operating principles of DC machines
2. Describe the operating principles of:
* Single phase AC motors (capacitor start, induction start, universal)
* Three phase AC motors (squirrel cage; wound-rotor)
* Inverter motor/variable frequency drive
* Synchronous motors
3. State the basic types, applications and limitations of:
* Single phase AC motors (capacitor start, induction start, universal)
* Three phase AC motors (squirrel cage; wound-rotor)
* Inverter motor/variable frequency drive
* Synchronous motors
4. Describe the operating principles, limitations and applications of motor control

DC machines:
* Series
* Shunt
* Compound

Motor control:
* Direct-online
* Star-Delta
* Rotor-resistance
* Soft-start
* Variable frequency

Outcome 9 - Understand the operating principles of different electrical components

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. Specify the main types and operating principles of the following electrical components:
* Contactors
* Relays
* Solenoids
* Over-current protection devices:
– Fuses (HRC, cartridge and re-wireable)
– Circuit-breakers
* RCDs
* RCBOs
2. Describe how the following components are applied in electrical systems / equipment and state their limitations:
* Contactors
* Relays
* Solenoids
* Over-current protection devices:
– Fuses (HRC, cartridge and re-wireable)
– Circuit-breakers
* RCDs
* RCBOs.

Outcome 10 - Understand the principles and applications of electrical lighting systems

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Explain the basic principles of illumination and state the applications of:
* Inverse square law
* Cosine law
* Lumen method
2. Explain the operating principles, types, limitations and applications of luminaires.

Luminaires:
* General Lighting Service (GLS)
– Tungsten
– Halogen
* Mercury vapour
– Low pressure
– High pressure
– Metal halide
* Sodium vapour
– Low pressure
– High pressure
* Energy saving (such as compact fluorescent lamps)
* LED

Outcome 11 - Understand the principles and applications of electrical heating

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Explain the basic principles of electrical space heating and electrical water heating
2. Explain the operating principles, types, limitations and applications of electrical space and water heating appliances and components.

Electrical space and water heating appliances and components:
* Immersion heaters
* Storage heaters
* Convector heaters
* Under floor heating
* Controls, timers and programmers for heating systems

Outcome 12 - Understand the types, applications and limitations of electronic components in electrotechnical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Describe the function and application of electronic components that are used in electrotechnical systems
2. State the basic operating principles and applications of electronic components.

Electrotechnical systems:
* Security alarms
* Telephones
* Dimmer switches
* Heating/boiler controls
* Motor control

Electronic components:
* Capacitors
* Resistors
* Rectifiers
* Diodes
* Thermistors
* Diacs
* Triacs
* Transistors
* Thyristors
* Invertors

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Unit 322 – Understanding the Practices and Procedures for Planning and Preparing to Maintain Electrotechnical Systems and Equipment

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand the practices and procedures for planning and preparing to maintain electrotechnical systems and equipment. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills to maintain electrotechnical systems and equipment.

Learning Outcomes

There are four learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
. 

  1. Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for preparing work sites for the maintenance of electrotechnical systems and equipment
  2. Understand the procedures for checking the work location prior to the commencement of work activities
  3. Understand how to determine client requirements for the maintenance of electrical systems and equipment
  4. Understand how to determine work requirements for the maintenance of electrical systems and equipment.
Outcome 1 - Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for preparing work sites for the maintenance of electrotechnical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the appropriate requirements of regulations that are applicable to electrotechnical maintenance work activities
2. Specify the actions required to ensure that electrical maintenance work sites are correctly prepared in terms of Health and Safety considerations
3. Specify the requirements for preparing and reviewing the work location prior to commencement of maintenance work activities
4. Identify personal protective equipment appropriate to the work activity being carried out
5. Confirm that tools and equipment are fit for purpose and (where appropriate) are correctly calibrated.

Regulations:
* Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations
* Electricity at Work Regulations
* Health and Safety at Work Act
* Current version of the IEE Wiring Regulations
* Memorandum of Guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulation 1989

Health and Safety considerations:
* Provision for safe access and egress
* Checking immediate work location for potential hazards as appropriate to property, plant, machinery, personnel and livestock
* Confirm that appropriate risk assessments and method statements have been produced

Requirements for preparing and reviewing the work location:
* Identification of specifications for maintenance, including drawings, diagrams (circuit and wiring), maintenance schedules / specifications, data charts, manufacturer’s manuals, servicing records / running logs, flow charts, standard maintenance time records
* Organisation of a work plan, including definition of task; planned shut downs / isolations; safety precautions (provision for release of stored and latent energy); permits to work, organising tools, equipment and spare parts; documentation; communication with relevant parties; time/cost effectiveness
* Identification and selection of safe isolation methods for electrical systems and pressurised systems (ie hydraulic, compressed air, water, gas)
* Identification and selection of methods to safely secure work areas including fences, barriers, screens and warning signs
* Identification and selection of suitable: hand and power tools (110V ac or battery operated); portable and fixed lifting equipment; access equipment
* Provision for safe storage of tools, equipment and materials

Outcome 2 - Understand the procedures for checking the work location prior to the commencement of work activities

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the preparations that should be completed before electrical maintenance work starts
2. Explain how to check for any pre-existing damage to client property and state why it is important to do this prior to commencement of any work activity
3. State the actions that should be taken if pre-existing damage to customer / client property, plant or machinery is identified
4. Specify methods for protecting the fabric and structure of property, plant or machinery before and during maintenance work.

Preparations:
* Interpretation of specifications and maintenance schedules to produce accurate material and equipment requisites
* Identification and selection of material, equipment and components compatible to specification or maintenance schedule
* Confirmation of site readiness for maintenance work including considerations of building structures and fabric
* Confirmation that tools, equipment and instruments are fit for purpose
* Confirmation of secure site storage for tools, equipment, materials and components
* Identification of suitable access equipment
* Identification of suitable lifting equipment
* Identification of suitable work methods
* Identification of points in the maintenance programme where coordination with other trades and personnel may be necessary

Client property:
* Building wall / floor fabric
* Plant and machinery
* Equipment and components
* Building décor and floor finishes

Outcome 3 - Understand how to determine client requirements for the maintenance of electrical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Interpret site drawings, plans, maintenance schedules / specifications and the work location to determine client requirements
2. Interpret appropriate sources of information when determining client requirements
3. Evaluate possible proposals to determine how well they meet:
* Client requirements
* Site structures and features
* Industry requirements
4. Identify methods of presenting information to clients to agree and proceed with a plan of work
5. State the process and implications that a change in work plans can have in terms of:
* Health and safety
* Cost
* Time
* Progress
* Authorisation
6. Identify that proposed replacement systems or components comply with industry requirements and where appropriate, give alternative system options which take account of environment and efficiency.

Sources of information:
* Statutory documents
* Codes of practice
* British standards

Outcome 4 - Understand how to determine work requirements for the maintenance of electrical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. State the characteristics of different types of electrical maintenance activities
2. Specify the importance of:
* Agreeing start dates, finish dates and timings
* Procedures for agreeing variations to the maintenance specification or schedule
3. Define the specific range of job information that is required for maintenance work
4. State how specific job information can be used to help develop work proposals
5. Specify the replacement / re-fitting requirements for components within maintained electrical systems and equipment
6. State appropriate methods for determining the size and specification / type of components to be used when maintaining electrical systems and equipment
7. Interpret drawings and maintenance schedules / specifications to calculate resources required to complete electrical maintenance work
8. Identify the implications that different working conditions could have on equipment and components in an electrical installation.

Electrical maintenance activities:
* Planned preventative
* Breakdown
* Monitored
* Non-routine maintenance

Job information:
* Statutory documents
* Codes of practice
* British standards
* Manufacturer’s specifications
* Legal requirements for maintenance:
– Common law requirements
– Specific legal requirements (plant / equipment in scope to include: lifts, hoists,
– Cranes, cradle systems; electrical equipment in stated premises)
– Implied legal requirements (portable appliance testing, boiler plant above 150kW)

Electrical Systems and Equipment:
Systems:
* Three-line four wire distribution systems
* ELV and LV single and multiphase circuits
* Lighting systems
* Heating and ventilating systems
* Air conditioning and refrigeration systems
* Drive systems
* Security systems
* Earthing systems
* Data communication
* PV supplies

Equipment:
* Electrical plant, components and accessories
* Motors and starters
* Switchgear and distribution panels
* Control systems and components
* Luminaires and lamps
* Drive systems

Resources required:
* Materials for plant, equipment and components for use within maintenance programmes – thermoplastic, thermosetting (rubber compounds), fibre glass sleeving, varnish (shellac), ceramics, metals (conductors, structural), solvents
* Tools and equipment: Hand tools; power tools (110V ac or battery operated); portable and fixed lifting equipment; access equipment; rotating, positioning and straightening devices; jacking devices and rams; trolleys / hand operated trucks

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Unit 323 – Understanding the Practices and Procedures for Maintaining Electrotechnical Systems and Equipment

This unit is designed to enable learners to understand the practices and procedures for maintaining electrotechnical systems and equipment. Its content is the knowledge needed by a learner to underpin the application of skills to maintain electrotechnical systems and equipment.

Learning Outcomes

There are five learning outcomes to this unit. The learner will:
 .

  1. Understand the practices, procedures and regulatory requirements for completing the safe isolation of an electrical installation in whole or in part
  2. Understand the characteristics and applications of consumer supply systems
  3. Understand the specific Health and Safety requirements for the completion of maintenance activities on electrical systems and equipment
  4. Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing maintenance work activities on electrical systems, components and equipment
  5. Understand the procedures and documentary systems which underpin work required to maintain electrical systems and equipment.
Outcome 1 - Understand the practices, procedures and regulatory requirements for completing the safe isolation of an electrical installation in whole or in part

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Specify and undertake the correct procedure for completing safe isolation
2. State the implications of carrying out safe isolations to:
* Other personnel
* Clients
* Public
* Building systems (loss of supply).
3. State the implications of not carrying out safe isolations to:
* Self
* Other personnel
* Clients
* Public
* Building systems (loss of supply).

Correct procedure:
* Carrying out safe working practices
* Correct identification of circuit(s) to be isolated
* Identifying suitable points of isolation
* Selecting correct test and proving instruments in accordance with relevant industry guidance and standards
* Correct testing methods
* Selecting locking devices for securing isolation
* Correct warning notices
* Correct sequence for isolating circuits

Outcome 2 - Understand the characteristics and applications of consumer supply systems

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Explain the characteristics and applications of systems
2. Specify the arrangements for electrical installations and systems with regard to provision for:
* Isolation and switching
* Overcurrent protection
* Earth fault protection.

Systems:
* Earthing arrangements:
– TN-S
– TNC-S
– TN-C
– TT
– IT
* Supply systems:
– Single phase
– Three phase
– Three phase and neutral

Outcome 3 - Understand the specific Health and Safety requirements for the completion of maintenance activities on electrical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can:
1. State the procedures for carrying out an assessment of risks and implementing safe systems of work for the completion of maintenance activities
2. Identify the appropriate Health and Safety regulations which apply to work activities, and the persons who are legally responsible for Health and Safety
3. State how to:
* Select and use appropriate tools and equipment for specific maintenance jobs, including:
– Hand tools
– Power tools (110V ac or battery operated)
– Portable and fixed lifting equipment
– Access equipment
– Rotating, positioning and straightening devices
– Jacking devices and rams
– Trolleys and hand operated trucks
* Select and use appropriate materials for specific maintenance jobs, including:
– Materials for plant, equipment and components for use within maintenance programmes – thermoplastic, thermosetting (rubber compounds), fibre glass sleeving, varnish (shellac), ceramics, metals (conductors, structural), solvents
4. Identify inappropriate work practices and state the implications if such practices are employed.

Outcome 4 - Understand the principles, regulatory requirements and procedures for completing maintenance work activities on electrical systems, components and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. Identify and interpret appropriate sources of information relevant to maintenance activities
2. Interpret diagrams, drawings, maintenance schedules and specifications to identify the replacement / re-fitting requirements of wiring systems and equipment as applicable to maintenance procedures
3. State the work methods and procedures for completing maintenance activities for the following:
* Systems:
– Three-line four wire distribution systems
– ELV and LV single and multiphase circuits
– Lighting systems
– Heating and ventilating systems
– Air conditioning and refrigeration systems
– Drive systems
– Security systems
– Earthing systems
– Data communication
* Equipment:
– Electrical plant, components and accessories
– Motors and starters
– Switchgear and distribution panels
– Control systems and components
– Contactors
– Power transmission mechanisms
– Luminaires and lamps; drive systems
4. State the requirements for completing appropriate corrective actions / repairs when problems are identified.

Sources of information:
* Statutory documents
* Codes of practice
* British standards (including current version of IEE wiring regulations)
* Maintenance schedules
* Manufacturer’s guidance documents

Requirements:
* Cables:
– Thermosetting insulated cables including flexes
– Single and multicore thermoplastic (PVC) and thermosetting insulated cables
– PVC/PVC flat profile cable
– MICC (with and without PVC sheath)
– SWA cables (PILC, XLPE, PVC)
– Armoured / braided flexible cables and cords
– Data cables
– Fibre optic cable
– Fire resistant cable
* Equipment:
– Electrical plant, components and accessories
– Motors and starters
– Switchgear and distribution panels
– Control systems and components
– Contactors
– Power transmission mechanisms
– Luminaires and lamps
– Drive Systems

Problems:
* When it is appropriate to carry out repairs
* The advantages and limitations of repair against component replacement
* Responsibilities for making decisions regarding repairs that are required
* Approved procedures for the completion of repairs
* Likely implications for relevant parties of carrying out effective repairs

Outcome 5 - Understand the procedures and documentary systems which underpin work required to maintain electrical systems and equipment

The assessment criteria is that the learner can: 
1. State the reasons why it is necessary to undertake regular inspection, adjustment and replacement of different electrical systems and equipment
2. Specify the documentary processes and procedures that are necessary for electrical maintenance work.

Documentary processes and procedures:
* Workplace requirements for, and the importance of:
– Documenting information
– Reporting findings and variations from the maintenance schedule
* Procedures for the completion of necessary maintenance documentation – including appropriate organisational or external quality assurance systems

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Still Have Questions About Your NVQ Level 3 Electrical?

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